Knox
Master’s
Degrees

Master of Arts (Biblical & Theological Studies)

Master of Arts (Christian & Classical Studies)

(MABTS)

Master of Arts (Biblical & Theological Studies)

The three-year, fully online Master of Arts (Biblical and Theological Studies) program gives you the freedom to earn your master’s degree from almost anywhere. The curriculum delves into the Bible’s grand narrative, grounding you in systematic theology, church history, ethics, apologetics, hermeneutics, and more. The Logos E-Track coursework equips you for lifelong ministry, church leadership, and personal faith, taking you deep into inductive Bible study and the original languages. The application deadline is January 1.

Academic Requirements for Admission

A bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution or the educational equivalent is required.

Academic Requirement for Completion

The online Master of Arts (Biblical and Theological Studies) requires completion of a total of 60 credit hours and a comprehensive examination. To graduate, a student must earn at least a grade of C- (1.7) in each course and have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale).

Upon successful completion, the student is awarded the Master of Arts (Biblical and Theological Studies) degree.

Learning Outcomes

A graduate of the MA (Biblical and Theological Studies) program at Knox will:

  • Effectively communicate Christ and His gospel throughout the entirety of Scripture
  • Be increasingly transformed by the gospel and grow in desire and competence for sharing that gospel with others
  • Articulate the centrality of the gospel for every aspect of Christian life and ministry
  • Thoughtfully exegete his or her culture and understand the Christian’s responsibility to participate in God’s work of making all things new
  • Faithfully work with the original languages of the Scriptures for theological and pastoral work

Course Requirements

Logos E-Track 9 Hours/Credits

NT510: E-Inductive Bible Study3

This course introduces the student to the basic components of sound inductive Bible study. It explores the foundational inductive methods of observation, interpretation, and application.

NT500: E-Greek3

Building upon the foundational skills learned in Inductive Bible Study, this course continues the inductive method by introducing the student to the basic principles of working with the New Testament Greek text in Logos Bible Software. Principles for responsible use of the Bible Study Guides in the Logos interface will be emphasized.

OT500: E-Hebrew3

Building upon the foundational skills learned in Inductive Bible Study, this course continues the inductive method by introducing the student to the basic principles of working with the Old Testament Hebrew text in Logos Bible Software. Principles for responsible use of the Bible Study Guides in the Logos interface will be emphasized.

New Testament Studies 6 Hours/Credits

NT502: New Testament 1—Gospel and Acts3

This course presents critical and introductory issues in the scholarship of the Gospels and Acts. The issues will be such topics as: the synoptic problem, seeming contradictions between the gospels, an introduction to the historical Jesus conversation, and historical considerations in the book of Acts. This class will divide itself into three sections: first, the background of second-temple Judaism before the birth of Christ, second, the Gospels and particular exegetical issues inherent in Gospel scholarship, including the life of Jesus; third, the book of Acts and introductory/historical issues that are particular to this important book of Church History.

NT504: New Testament 2—Epistles and Revelation3

This course will present critical and introductory issues in the New Testament epistles. The issues will include such topics as authorship, normative vs. cultural understanding of commands contained in the epistles, the authorship of disputed epistles, and the life and work of the apostle Paul. These issues will be in addition to the typical introduction and overview of the books from Romans to Revelation.

Old Testament Studies 6 Hours/Credits

OT602: Old Testament 1—Genesis to 2 Samuel3

This course is the first of two classes that constitute a survey of the Old Testament canon. Beginning with the creation account in Genesis, this class traces the redemptive-historical development through to the end of King David’s reign. The emphasis is on the narrative of the Bible story as presented through sacred history.

OT604: Old Testament 2—2 Samuel to Malachi3

This course completes the survey of the Old Testament canon and the conclusion of the redemptive-historical story up to the time of Christ. Much attention will be given to Hebrew Psalmody and wisdom literature as well as the prophetic oracles that established the contours of the history of Israel.

Biblical Theology Studies 3 Hours/Credits

ST502: Biblical Theology 3

This class examines the literary and historical development of major Biblical themes across redemptive history. It is developed through a method of Biblical intertextuality and thematic concordance. It examines the relationship of protology and eschatology, and the progress of redemption focused on the centrality of Christ, His suffering and glory throughout the Scriptures. Key concepts explored include the covenants, the tabernacle/temple, and the city or “kingdom” of God.

Systematic Theology Studies 9 Hours/Credits

ST506: Systematic Theology 1—God and Creation3

In this course the students will examine the character of God, the creation, and the nature of humanity. The students will be introduced to pertinent Biblical texts and themes, theological terms, key figures, and the importance of culture and history in framing various debates. As the first of three courses in systematic theology, particular attention will be given to theological method and the nature of theology as Biblical reasoning within God’s economy of grace.

ST602: Systematic Theology 2—Christ and the Church3

In this course the students will examine the person and work of Christ (the historia salutis), as seen in the context of God’s covenant of grace and in the community of His people created by His gospel. The students will be introduced to pertinent Biblical texts and themes, theological terms, key figures, and the importance of culture and history in framing various debates. As the second of three courses in systematic theology, particular attention will be given to the centrality of the gospel in all Christian theology.

ST604: Systematic Theology 3—Salvation and Eschatology3

In this course the students will examine the application of the gospel to individuals and to the whole earth. We will focus on the application of salvation (the ordo salutis), the means of grace, and the kingdom of God. The students will be introduced to pertinent Biblical texts and themes, theological terms, key figures, and the importance of culture and history in framing various debates. As the last of three courses in systematic theology, particular attention will be given to the eschatological shape of all Christian theology.

Church History Studies 6 Hours/Credits

CH502: History of Christianity 1—Ancient and Medieval3

This course provides a detailed study of the theology of the ancient and medieval church. In each era, key figures, confessions, and themes are examined (focusing especially on issues of Biblical interpretation, the doctrine of the Trinity, Christology, and church practice). Students gain familiarity with these eras by reading primary source texts, including the Apostolic Fathers, Irenaeus, the Cappadocians, Augustine, Cyril of Alexandria, Anselm, and Thomas Aquinas.

CH504: History of Christianity 2—Reformation to Modern Era3

This course provides a detailed study of the Protestant Reformation, Puritanism, and various modern movements and events (including revivalism, the Enlightenment, fundamentalist-modernist controversies, the Second Vatican Council, postmodernism, and the rise of global South Christianity). In each era, key figures, confessions, and themes are examined. Students gain familiarity with these eras by reading primary source texts, including Luther, Dordt, Owen, Edwards, Kant, Barth, and Machen.

Ethics and Apologetics 5 Hours/Credits

ST706: Apologetics 3

This course provides an introduction to the need and basis for Christian apologetics. Students will discuss various apologetic barriers (e.g., refusal to believe in absolute truth, refusal to listen to propositional statements, etc.) and explore possible answers to these barriers. The focus of the class will be on objections which might be encountered in the course of personal evangelism or other church work.

ST608: Ethics 2

This course examines the relationship of the Gospel to obedience. It considers the theological virtues of faith, hope, and love. It then addresses the role of the law as a framework for Christian life, noting the impact of redemptive-historical and cultural shifts in our appropriation of the law.

Missions and Evangelism 2 Hours/Credits

ME702: Missions 2

This course examines the Biblical vision for evangelism, both within and beyond the walls of the church with special attention to the relationship of evangelism to the sovereignty of God, the specific nature of the atonement, and the doctrine of covenant children. A major portion of the course will involve training students in methods of encouraging churches to become mission-supporting congregations, designed to enrich the theological understanding of evangelism in the preaching and teaching ministry of the church and in personal witnessing.

Hermeneutics Studies 3 Hours/Credits

NT712: Biblical Hermeneutics 3

This capstone course culminates the program by engaging students with literary interpretation and sound biblical exegesis. It takes the student into exegetically rich Greek New Testament and Hebrew Old Testament passages to polish his or her interpretive skills.

Electives 11 Hours/Credits

Total: 60 Hours/Credits